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PUTTING THEIR SKILLS TO GOOD USE!  QUICK ACTIONS BY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH STAFF SAVED A WOMAN'S LIFE

Behavioral Health staff

 ABOVE (Left to Right): Mercedes Brantley, Cheryl Briggs, Creashundra Daniel, & Tina Jenkins-Jones in front of the Center for Health & Rehabilitation

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Wednesday, April 19th is a day that four employees in the Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities will never forget.  A client was sitting in the lobby at the Center for Health & Rehabilitation waiting for her scheduled appointment with the psychiatrist.  She was accompanied by a certified Nursing Assistant.  

Tina Jenkins-Jones, Administrative Assistant, saw the woman and immediately knew that something was wrong.  She was sweating profusely and looked ill.  Tina got a stack of wet napkins and wiped the woman's face and forehead.  Creashundra Daniel, Public Health Nurse technician, discreetly took the client's nursing assistant aside and told her to call 911 immediately. Mercedes Brantly, Public Health Nurse Technician, retrieved Cheryl Briggs, a registered nurse with the Department, who also wiped the woman's face with wettowels and asked a few questions to determine the severity of her illness

All four employees stayed with the client until paramedics arrived.  The paramedics thought she was having a heart attack and rushed her to Atlanta Medical Center.  The following day, the client called Ms. Jenkins-Jones from the Intensive Care Unit at the hospital, and reported that she had suffered a mild stroke.  She thanked the staff for saving her life.  "She called to say thank you so much for helping her," says Jenkins-Jones.  "She said that she really appreciated us."  "After hearing her voice on the telephone the next day, I felt overwhelmed and thankful that this lady was okay," said Nurse Briggs.    

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  REMEMBERING COMMISSION VICE CHAIR JOAN P. GARNER'S COMMITMENT TO A HEALTHIER FULTON

Commissioner Joan P. Garner

ABOVE: Fulton County Commission Chair Joan P. Garner

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On Tuesday, April 18th, all of us were shocked and saddened by the death of Fulton County Board of Commissioners Vice Chair Joan P. Garner.  Commissioner Garner passed away after a lengthy fight with triple negative breast cancer.  The May Health Services E-Newsletter will feature articles on the Commissioner's support of programs in both the Department of behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities, and the Department of Health & Wellness.

In his moving tribute to Commission Vice Chair Garner, Fulton County Commission Chairman John H. Eaves discussed her commitment to helping to improve the health of Fulton County residents.  "She worked tirelessly to fight against health disparities and became our Executive Sponsor of the All People Are Healthy Priority Area," said Chairman Eaves.  She, along with Chairman Eaves, co-founded the Fulton County Task Force on HIV/AIDS.

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DETERMINED TO LEAVE A LEGACY, THIS COUNTY EMPLOYEE SAYS FAREWELL BY CONNECTING KIDS TO RESOURCES

Patricia Jackson

 ABOVE: Patricia Jackson and Julious George, Founder & CEO of Young Generation Movement, Inc.

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April 28th was a big day for Patricia Jackson, Outreach Worker Lead at the Fulton County Oak Hill Child, Adolescent & Family Center (www.oakhillkids.org).  After 17 years, it was her final day on the job and the start of retirement.  However, Pat is not saying goodbye forever to Fulton County.  Instead, she has established an exciting collaboration between Oak Hill and two dynamic non-profit organizations that are having a positive impact on the lives of children from economically disadvantaged communities.    

"I just love working with children and youth because you can really impact their lives if you are understanding, kind, and show them respect," says Jackson.  Leaders from Young Generation Movement, Inc., and the Book Bank Foundation are excited about the partnership, and will meet with parents of youth receiving services to discuss their activities that helps build character, improve the community, and provides guidance on shaping their futures.

Jackson plans to volunteer at oak Hill and actively participate with this initiative after she is retired. "Even in her retirement, it is impressive that she is devoting her time and attention to furthering the community and helping young people," says Dr.LaJoyce Brown-Lewis, Interim Behavioral Health Program Manager.

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